Driving News – A-1 Driving School

Raiders RB Josh Jacobs Arrested for DUI

Photo: Google Images

Jacobs, 22, was arrested near McCarran Airport in Las Vegas just hours after the Raiders won their regular-season finale against the Denver Broncos.

Jacobs sustained minor injuries from the crash and was transported to a local hospital for treatment. Jacobs was then transported to the Clark County Detention Center where he was booked on a DUI charge.

A Las Vegas prosecutor who spoke with the Associated Press said Jacobs suffered a cut on his forehead when an air bag deployed in his Acura sports car after he crashed into a tunnel wall at the airport. The prosecutor added that blood was drawn from Jacobs at the detention center to determine his alcohol level.

“No complaint has been filed against our client and there are no blood test results to support a suggestion of impairment,” attorneys for Jacobs said.

DUI Laws | What You Need to Know

The laws make it illegal for drivers of all ages to operate motor vehicles if they have BAC percentages of:

  • 0.08% or higher, if they’re 21 years old or older operating regular passenger vehicles.
  • 0.04% or higher, if they’re operating commercial vehicles.
  • 0.02% or higher, if they’re younger than 21 years old.

Georgia State law also requires clinical evaluation and the attendance of a DUI / Risk Reduction Program that’s certified/licensed by the Georgia Department of Driver’s Services before your driver’s license can be reinstated if you have been charged with any of the following:

  1. DUI
  2. Drug Possession
  3. Other drug offenses
  4. Under-age possession of drugs or alcohol

Before getting behind the wheel after having a few, consider the many reasons why you should not.

For more information about DUI School visit www.a1drivingschools.com or call (770) 962-9555!

Please Slow Down and Move Over!

Officials say Sgt. Daniel Mobley was hit by a vehicle while at the scene of an accident involving another officer along the Downtown Connector near Andrew Young International Blvd.

Mobley was struck by a car as he was getting out of his patrol unit. Medics rushed him to Grady Memorial Hospital, but he did not survive his injuries.

Photo: Google Images

“Sergeant Mobley was responding to the area of I-85 and 75 to investigate a crash one of our officers was involved in,” said DeKalb County Police Chief Mirtha Ramos. “Unfortunately as he exited the vehicle he was struck by an oncoming car.”

The Georgia State Patrol said the driver of a Ford Focus lost control going into a curve, struck the right concrete barrier wall, and then struck Sgt. Mobley and his patrol car.

The driver of the Ford Focus also was taken to Grady, but only suffered minor injuries, troopers said.

“If we are driving a county vehicle a supervisor has to respond to investigate it. It’s like an independent investigation outside the crash. We do our own supervisory investigation,” the chief said. “When one of our officers is involved in an accident a supervisor has to respond and do a supervisory investigation. He was on his way to do just that. So, he himself was on his way to investigate an accident that had already occurred when he himself became the victim of an accident.”

The off-duty officer was not injured in either crash but is hurting along with his colleagues at Mobley’s loss.

The Georgia State Patrol released a statement late Saturday that reads:

“Our thoughts and prayers are with Sgt. Mobley’s family, loved ones, and the entire DeKalb County Police Department.”

Officials are asking people to pray for Mobley and his family.

The Georgia Move Over Law requires drivers to move-over one lane when possible if an emergency vehicle with flashing lights is parked on the shoulder of the highway. And if traffic is too heavy to move-over safely, the law requires drivers to slow down below the posted speed limit instead AND to be prepared to stop.

Move Over Law:

  •  The operator of a motor vehicle approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle that is displaying flashing yellow, amber, white, red, or blue lights shall approach the authorized emergency vehicle with due caution and shall, absent any other direction by a peace officer, proceed as follows:
    1. Make a lane change into a lane not adjacent to the authorized emergency vehicle if possible in the existing safety and traffic conditions; or
    2. If a lane change under paragraph (1) of this subsection would be impossible, prohibited by law, or unsafe, reduce the speed of the motor vehicle to a reasonable and proper speed for the existing road and traffic conditions, which speed shall be less than the posted speed limit, and be prepared to stop.
  • Violation of subsection (a) or (b) of this Code section shall be punished by a fine of not more than $500.00.

There is a lot of useful information such as this Move Over Law that is taught in driving the class and it will apply whether you have been driving for years or you are a brand new driver.

For more information about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

Car Insurance 2021 Tips!

The first couple of years of driving for a teenager are statistically the most dangerous of all. Teen drivers can lower their car crash risk by enrolling in a defensive driving course!

Teen drivers that graduate a defensive driving course can get the following benefits:

Photo: Google Images
  • Learning the fundamentals of driving. Teen drives will learn the traffic rules in a systemic way.
  • Builds confidence. The first time behind the wheels can be a scary or stressful experience for a teen driver. Teen drivers can practice in a safe environment, where they can build confidence in their abilities and skills as they learn how to drive with the help of an experienced driver.
  • Shows them the risks. Teen drivers need to be aware that driving is dangerous. Being too nervous is dangerous, but if a teen driver is not nervous at all, it means he is not aware of how risky driving can be. Teens will learn how dangerous driving can be and what risks are involved. They will also learn how to avoid those risks.
  • Learning the consequences. In this course, teens will learn about the effects of driving under influence (DUI). Teen drivers will also learn they will have to take responsibility for their safety and the safety of others.
  • Practice time. Teenagers will practice their driving skills in a safe, supervised environment. Teen drivers can learn driving techniques from qualified instructors and can develop their skills.
  • Learn the state’s laws. Traffic laws differ from one state to another. Depending on which state the teen driver is taking the course, he will be presented with the laws of that state.
  • Cheaper insurance premiums. Insurance companies place the teen drivers in the high-risk category, thus they have to pay more for their insurance. One way for teen drivers to lower their car insurance rates is by graduating a defensive driving course.

For additional info about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

Driving Tips for The New Year!

Photo: Google Images

Car insurance rate premiums shoot up by around 130 – 140% when a teen driver is added to an existing policy and can rise an additional 20 – 40% if that driver gets a speeding ticket or has an accident.

Rates like these tend to remain in place until a driver turns 20.

The first couple of years of driving for a teenager are statistically the most dangerous of all. Teen drivers can lower their car crash risk by enrolling in a defensive driving course!

Teen drivers that graduate a defensive driving course can get the following benefits:

  • Learning the fundamentals of driving. Teen drives will learn the traffic rules in a systemic way.
  • Builds confidence. The first time behind the wheels can be a scary or stressful experience for a teen driver. Teen drivers can practice in a safe environment, where they can build confidence in their abilities and skills as they learn how to drive with the help of an experienced driver.
  • Shows them the risks. Teen drivers need to be aware that driving is dangerous. Being too nervous is dangerous, but if a teen driver is not nervous at all, it means he is not aware of how risky driving can be. Teens will learn how dangerous driving can be and what risks are involved. They will also learn how to avoid those risks.
  • Learning the consequences. In this course, teens will learn about the effects of driving under influence (DUI). Teen drivers will also learn they will have to take responsibility for their safety and the safety of others.
  • Practice time. Teenagers will practice their driving skills in a safe, supervised environment. Teen drivers can learn driving techniques from qualified instructors and can develop their skills.
  • Learn the state’s laws. Traffic laws differ from one state to another. Depending on which state the teen driver is taking the course, he will be presented with the laws of that state.
  • Cheaper insurance premiums. Insurance companies place the teen drivers in the high-risk category, thus they have to pay more for their insurance. One way for teen drivers to lower their car insurance rates is by graduating a defensive driving course.

For additional info about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

How Much Does a DUI Cost?

You can expect to pay upwards of $10,000 to $25,000 for a first-time DUI, according to American Addiction Centers (AAC).

All the costs below are for a first-time offense. If you’ve been arrested for driving under the influence before, you’re likely to face much harsher penalties and fines.

Bail

When you’re caught driving under the influence, you should expect to be arrested immediately. Getting bail will cost anywhere from $100 to $2,500, according to the AAC.

Impound fees

Unless you have a sober passenger who can take over when you’re arrested, the police will have to tow your car, then store it while you’re in jail. These fees can vary substantially, from as little as $100 to as much as $1,200.

DUI fines

You can expect the court to fine you between $150 to $1,800 for the DUI charge, but it probably won’t end there.

The court may also level fines for your jail time ($10 to $300), sentencing ($100 to $250), probation ($200 to $1,200), and community service supervision ($100).

Attorney fees

The cost of a professional defense can vary wildly. Don’t expect to pay less than $1,500, and a good lawyer fighting a difficult case could cost $5,000 to $10,000 or more.

DMV fees

Your license may be suspended as soon as you’re arrested, though a conviction will almost certainly result in you losing your driving privileges for several months.

You’ll then face expenses including reinstatement fees at the Department of Motor Vehicles that can run anywhere from $20 to $200 and up.

Traffic school/alcohol education costs

If convicted, you’ll likely be required to attend traffic school or substance abuse classes in order to get your license reinstated.

These courses can cost as little as $350 or as much as $2,000 over the course of your probation.

Ignition interlock device (IID)

Many states require even first-time offenders to install an IID in their car. This “in-car breathalyzer” will detect your blood alcohol concentration, and you’ll have to blow into it before your car will start.

Mothers Against Drunk Driving estimates that it costs $70 to $150 to install and then $60 to $80 a month to monitor and calibrate the device. That can easily run you $1,000 or more, depending on how long you’re required to use an IID.

You could also be required to take random urine tests — at your own expense — as a condition of your bail or probation. That could easily cost over $100.

GEORGIA DUI LAWS:

Georgia drivers can be charged with DUI if their blood alcohol content (BAC) is .08 percent or higher.

When you are arrested for a DUI in Georgia, you’ll have to deal with both a criminal case and a separate license suspension. The Georgia Department of Driver Services will handle your license suspension pursuant to the implied consent laws and the GA criminal courts will prosecute the criminal case.

What happens in court won’t have any bearing on the status of your driver’s license and vice versa.

The Georgia courts impose criminal penalties including:

  • Fines;
  • Jail time;
  • Public service.

The Department of Driver Services imposes administrative penalties including:

  • Suspension or revocation of your license.

The higher your BAC, the more severe your penalties may be. Multiple convictions will also result in harsher sentences.

For more information about DUI School visit www.a1drivingschools.com or call (770) 962-9555!

DUI Laws You Need to Know!

Penalties for DUI in Georgia are related to the number of prior offenses:

When someone has a first DUI in Georgia they face the following potential penalties:

  • 12 months of probation
  • A minimum fine of $300 plus court costs and surcharges
  • Between 1 – 10 days in jail, which many times can be waived
  • At least 40 hours of community service
  • Substance abuse counseling
  • Attendance of the DUI Risk Reduction School (commonly referred to as DUI School)
  • Attendance of a Madd Mothers Victim Impact Panel
  • Drivers License Suspension, with a limited permit to drive

When someone has a second DUI in Georgia, they face the following potential penalties:

  • Between 12 – 36 months of probation
  • Fines of between $600 – $1000, plus all applicable surcharges and court costs
  • Between 90 days – 12 months in jail, all of which can be done through probation except for at least 3 days that must be served in jail.
  • 30 days of community service (240 hours)
  • DUI School
  • Driver’s License Suspension
  • Red stripe on license
  • Installing of an ignition interlock device, after a “hard license suspension” of 120 days
  • Surrender of license plate
  • Mandatory substance abuse counseling
  • Potential DUI Court, in jurim
  • Photo publication in the legal organ of the county in which the offense occured

When someone has a third DUI in Georgia, they face the following potential penalties:

  • Between 12 -36 months of probation
  • Fines of $1000 – $5000, plus all court costs and surcharges
  • 120 days to 12 months in jail, with at least 15 days of actual incareceration (note a third DUI is a high and aggravated misdemeanor)
  • 30 days of community service (240 hours)
  • DUI School
  • Five (5) years of driver’s license suspension (with an interlock permit available after two years)
  • Surrender of license plate
  • Photo publication in the legal organ of the accused’s home county
  • Mandatory drug and alcohol treatment
  • Declaration of Habitual Violator Status
  • Potential DUI Court, in jurisdictions that have the program

Georgia State law also requires clinical evaluation and the attendance of a DUI / Risk Reduction Program that’s certified/licensed by the Georgia Department of Driver’s Services before your driver’s license can be reinstated if you have been charged with any of the following:

  1. DUI
  2. Drug Possession
  3. Other drug offenses
  4. Under-age possession of drugs or alcohol

For more information about DUI School visit www.a1drivingschools.com or call (770) 962-9555!

Honda Recall

Photo: Google Images

Honda has announced recalls of 430,000 vehicles to check and potentially replace the left and/or right front driveshafts because of salt corrosion. T

he recall will include the 2007–2014 Honda Fit, the 2012 Honda Civic Hybrid, the 2013 Acura ILX Hybrid, the 2013–2015 Acura ILX, and the 2013–2015 Honda Accord. The Accord is under a separate recall from the other vehicles, Honda said.

The automaker said the problem with the driveshafts is “a combination of potentially damaged or incorrectly cured protective coatings during driveshaft assembly and long-term exposure to road salt primarily used in the northeastern United States.

” If a driveshaft were to break, it could cause the vehicle to lose motive power or to roll while in park if the parking brake is not in use. However, Honda said no accidents or injuries have been reported to date.

Honda will recall 737,000 cars to update body control module (BCM) software. The problem is a “programming flaw” that could cause warning lights to light up unnecessarily and the rearview camera display, turn signals, and wipers to malfunction. There have been no reports of accidents or injuries.

This recall includes 2018–2020 Accord and Accord Hybrid and 2019–2020 Honda Insight vehicles. Owners will be notified starting in January, and they are asked to take their vehicles in to dealers for a software update to address the problem.

Whether you have been driving for years or you are a brand new driver, A-1 offers classes that will help you brush up on some rules and regulations before it’s too late.

If you have a clean driving record for 3 years, you may take the 6-hour Defensive Driving Program to receive a 10% -15% discount on your auto insurance premium. The insurance discount percentage is determined by your insurance company.

For more information about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

Two Teens Killed in Head-On Collision

According to Georgia State Patrol, a 2001 Acura driven by 17-year-old Tyrese Wright was going west on the highway near Watson Reynolds Road.

A 2019 Freightliner was driving in the eastbound lane near the same location.

GSP says “for unknown reasons,” the driver of the Acura — Wright — lost control and traveled across the double yellow lines.

The Freightliner and Acura then collided head-on, killing both Wright and his passenger, identified as 18-year-old Jonathan Jarrett.

The driver of the Freightliner, a 42-year-old from Hiram, was unharmed.

Georgia State Patrol says Wright and Jarrett were ‘unrestrained’ at the time of the accident.

The accident is still under investigation.

Our condolences go out to the family and friends of Tyrese Wright and Jonathan Jarrett.

Teen drivers that graduate a defensive driving course can get the following benefits:

  • Learning the fundamentals of driving
    • Teen drives will learn the traffic rules in a systemic way.
  • Builds confidence
    • The first time behind the wheels can be a scary or stressful experience for a teen driver. Teen drivers can practice in a safe environment, where they can build confidence in their abilities and skills as they learn how to drive with the help of an experienced driver.
  • Shows them the risks
    • Teen drivers need to be aware that driving is dangerous. Being too nervous is dangerous, but if a teen driver is not nervous at all, it means he is not aware of how risky driving can be. Teens will learn how dangerous driving can be and what risks are involved. They will also learn how to avoid those risks.
  • Learning the consequences
    • In this course, teens will learn about the effects of driving under influence (DUI). Teen drivers will also learn they will have to take responsibility for their safety and the safety of others.
  • Practice time
    • Teenagers will practice their driving skills in a safe, supervised environment. Teen drivers can learn driving techniques from qualified instructors and can develop their skills.
  • Learn the state’s laws
    • Traffic laws differ from one state to another. Depending on which state the teen driver is taking the course, he will be presented with the laws of that state.
  • Cheaper insurance premiums
    • Insurance companies place the teen drivers in the high-risk category, thus they have to pay more for their insurance. One way for teen drivers to lower their car insurance rates is by graduating a defensive driving course.

For additional info about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

What You Need to Know About Driver’s License Points

Your driver’s license gives you the legal right to drive. In return, you’re expected to obey the relevant traffic laws.

One way that many states keep track of your driving history is to assign points to your license if you get a ticket for a moving violation!

Photo: Google Images

Point System: Points are added to your license upon conviction of certain violations.  The Georgia Point System ranges from 2 to 6 points.

How many points will suspend your license?

A driver with 15 points in a 24 month period will have their license suspended. Licensed Georgia residents may request that the Department of Driver Services reduce the number of points assessed against their Georgia driver’s license.

How do I reduce points on my Georgia driver’s license?

  • Up to 7 points can be reduced once every 5 years.  In accordance with rule O.C.G.A §40-5-86
  • To qualify for a Points Reduction, you must successfully complete a certified Driver Improvement (defensive driving) course.  Once you complete the Driver Improvement (defensive driving) course: Bring the original certificate of completion to a DDS Customer Service Center or you can request a Points reduction by Mail.  Mail the original certificate of completion to the Georgia Department of Driver Services, P. O. Box 80447, Conyers, Georgia 30013.
  • A-1 is proud to say that we offer certified defensive driving classes visit a1drivingshcools.com for more information!

When are points not added?

  • You will not receive points for the following:
    • Speeding convictions less than 15 miles-per-hour over the posted speed limit
    • Convictions of driving “Too Fast for Conditions’
    • If you are a Non-Georgia Resident

For more information about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

Zero Tolerance Crackdown

Law enforcement agencies all across Georgia are joining forces to crack down on DUI, speeding, distracted driving, and violations of other traffic laws to reduce the number of crashes, injuries and deaths during the holiday season. They’re warning drivers they will go straight to jail.

The increased enforcement effort is part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s annual Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign, which runs from December 18, 2020 through January 1, 2020. 

Photo: Google Images

The pandemic may put fewer vehicles on the road, but state troopers say all impaired drivers will be arrested and no warnings will be issued.

Georgia’s legal limit for blood alcohol concentration is .08. 

Sobriety checkpoints will be set up throughout the state. Officials say a DUI arrest could cost drivers up to $10,000 in fines, legal fees, court costs and higher insurance premiums.

In Georgia, 375 out of the 1,504 traffic fatalities in 2018 were alcohol related. That’s 25 percent of all traffic deaths in the state. 14 people died on Georgia roads from 6 p.m. on Christmas Eve to 11:59 p.m. on Dec. 26.

All motorists can use the following tips to stay safe, focused, sober and patient while traveling:

  • Plan ahead for a sober ride.
  • Arrange for a designated driver, use a rideshare service or program the numbers for cab companies into your phone.
  • You can also plan to use public transportation, but check schedules ahead of time in case service is altered during the holiday.
  • Don’t try to make up time by speeding. Because of extra traffic on the road, leave for your destination earlier than needed to allow for increased travel time.
  • Make sure everyone in your vehicle is wearing their seat belt and all children under 8 are riding in an approved child passenger safety seat or booster seat.
  • Limit driver distractions by staying off phones. Program GPS before you get on the road or have a passenger be in charge of navigation.
  • Take breaks to avoid drowsy driving: Plan rest stops as needed and alternate drivers if possible!

Drivers can benefit from understanding state laws and penalties pertaining to impaired driving, especially now that the holidays are near.

The same safe driving practices that are taught in A-1’s Defensive Driving Class can be applied to be a safe driver in a car and on a motorcycle. There is a lot of very useful and informative information in the class and it will apply whether you have been driving for years or you are a brand new driver.

For more information about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschool.com!