Jenny Chiem – A-1 Driving School

Cameras To Be Installed At Select School Zones to Catch Speeders

Gwinnett County drivers are going to want to slow down when driving past schools from now on, or they may end up getting their pictures taken for a not-so-good reason.

County commissioners approved a request from Gwinnett County police to install speed cameras in some school zones. The request was based on research police did at six school zones, according to Deputy Chief J.D. McClure.

“We found fairly significant violations of speed limits,” McClure told commissioners. “The goal would be to identify and cite violators within our speed zones. The end result is increased safety for motorists and pedestrians in the form of students who may be walking to and from school.”

Initially, drivers will only be given warnings as county officials let them get used to the new process for looking for speeders. Notices will be installed before the county begins using the cameras.

The question that has not yet been answered, however, is where the cameras will be installed.

Photo: Google Images

Cpl. Ryan Winderweedle said the school zone speeding research that served as the basis for the police department’s request for the cameras was conducted at Lanier and Discovery high schools as well as Beaver Ridge, Camp Creek, Duncan Creek, and Ivey Creek elementary schools.

That does not necessarily mean those schools will be where the cameras will be installed.

Speeding causes accidents!

Whether you are 15 and in need of taking the course or 45 and you just want to brush up on the rules and regulations of driving, A-1 Driving School is here to help!

Atlanta Drivers Education has been mandated for all 16-year-old drivers. We are here to spread the awareness of safe driving habits and that driving is a very serious responsibility.

We have 19 convenient locations around the metro Atlanta area offering different programs. For more information call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

Probate Court Clerk Arrested in North Georgia

Photo: Google Images

A report from Rome Police on April 27 describes an officer arrived to find the chief probate court clerk, Charles Bradley Shelton, standing outside his wrecked vehicle.

The truck was hanging from an embankment according to the report.

The responding officer spoke to Shelton, who said he and fallen asleep. However, during the conversation, the officer said he smelled alcohol on him.

Upon being asked, Shelton admitted to having “a few drinks” the night before.

Shelton soon submitted to a field sobriety test but admitted to having a condition that made it difficult for him to stand for long periods of time. The officer said he ultimately submitted to multiple tests “after feeling that he had failed” the first one. He was apparently unable to complete those either.

It was during these tests that Shelton also admitted to taking two anti-anxiety pills that weren’t prescribed, police said. He also told the officer he had not slept in days due to a death in the family.

Shelton was ultimately charged with driving under the influence and failure to maintain his lane.

Following his arrest, Probate Court Judge Tony Brazier said that Shelton was placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of his case.

The next step for Charles Shelton is to complete a clinical evaluation and the attendance of a DUI / Risk Reduction Program that’s certified/licensed by the Georgia Department of Driver’s Services before his driver’s license can be reinstated since he has been charged with one of the following:

  1. DUI
  2. Drug Possession
  3. Other drug offenses
  4. Under-age possession of drugs or alcohol

For more information about DUI School visit www.a1drivingschools.com or call (770) 962-9555!

What Does Georgia’s ‘Slowpoke’ Law Say About The Left-Hand Lane?

If you’ve ever driven on the interstate, chances are you’ve been behind someone going slow in the left lane.

Cpl. Billy Schwab at the Georgia State Patrol’s Forsyth post breaks down the law.

“The left-hand lane on any roadway that has two or more lanes in a given direction, the left-hand lane is the fast lane. It’s used for passing traffic and turning left. It goes a step further and states that if you are occupying the left-hand lane regardless of your speed and regardless of the speed limit if a faster vehicle approaches you from the rear you have to move over and allow that faster vehicle to pass,” said Schwab.

The law applies to any road with two or more lanes, not just the interstate.

Photo: Google Images

Schwab says they give 50-100 tickets a month for violators of the slowpoke law, and the ticket violation amount varies from each county.

He said any trucks with more than six wheels have to stay in the two right lanes unless the Georgia Department of Transportation posts signs that say otherwise. Trucks over six wheels can get in the left lane if they’re using a left exit.

There is a lot of useful information such as this law taught in our classes and it will apply whether you have been driving for years or you are a brand new driver!

For more information about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

Driver Charged with Vehicular Homicide, Killing 6

A Georgia woman has been arrested and charged with six counts of homicide after police say she made a reckless lane change that led the van she was driving to crash, killing six passengers.

Photo: Google Images

The Gwinnett County Police Department issued a press release stating that they believe the driver of the van, Monica Manire, made an improper lane change on the interstate that caused the van carrying 16 passengers to flip on its side.

Police said that witnesses to the accident told them another vehicle unexpectedly changed lanes ahead of the van.

Manire’s vehicle flipped on its side, skidded across the interstate, and burst into flames, according to the AP.

Police said the vehicle ahead of the van did not remain at the scene of the accident.

The van Manire was driving had passengers from a sober living community called We Are Living Proof.

Our thoughts and prayers go to the family and friends of those tragically lost in this accident. 

Whether you are 15 and in need of taking the course or 45 and you just want to brush up on the rules and regulations of driving, A-1 Driving School is here to help!

Atlanta Drivers Education has been mandated for all 16-year-old drivers. We are here to spread the awareness of safe driving habits and that driving is a very serious responsibility.

We have 19 convenient locations around the metro Atlanta area offering different programs. For more information call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

IL ATV Crash Involving GA Man

A Georgia man is in the hospital after police say he was thrown from an ATV in Burnt Prairie, IL.

Police say Joel R. Rosenbeck, 40, of Wavery Hall, GA, was heading east on CR 2450 N and attempted to make a right turn onto CR 625 E. The ATV he was operating overturned, and he was thrown from the vehicle.

Rosenbeck was taken to an area hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

He was cited for driving under the influence, failure to reduce speed, and illegal operation of an ATV on a public road.

There are specific areas in Georgia where riders are permitted to operate an ATV or UTV without a driver’s license.  These areas are specially designated and the driver must be accompanied by a licensed adult.  Outside of these areas, you must have a valid driver’s license to operate an ATV or UTV on public land in Georgia.

You are not permitted to operate ATVs or UTVs on public streets in Georgia.

Consider taking a driving course at A-1 if you are interested in learning more rules and regulations such as these. There is a lot of very useful and informative information in the class and it will apply whether you have been driving for years or you are a brand new driver.

The same safe driving practices that are taught in A-1’s Defensive Driving Class can be applied to be a safe driver in a car and on a motorcycle!

For more information about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

Gwinnett Solicitor General Will Start to Prosecute DUIs in State Court

This means cases will now be prosecuted in a higher court.

Before DUIs were prosecuted in the recorders court.

The cases will instead be bound over and handled in Gwinnett’s State Court for motions and trials.

Photo: Google Images

“I have chosen to discontinue hearing these types of cases at Recorder’s Court because it is not a court of record, and the appellate process from motions decided in Recorder’s Court is limited to the Gwinnett County Superior Court,” Brian Whiteside said in a statement.

“In my judgment, decisions concerning violation of O.C.G.A § 40-6-391 (the section of Georgia law dealing with DUI) are so impactful that they should be heard by the Georgia Court of Appeals or the Supreme Court of Georgia.”

Whiteside said defendants who are likely to plead guilt or nolo contendere to DUI charges in Recorder’s Court will not be affected by the change.

Penalties for DUI in Georgia are related to the number of prior offenses:

When someone has a first DUI in Georgia they face the following potential penalties:

  • 12 months of probation
  • A minimum fine of $300 plus court costs and surcharges
  • Between 1 – 10 days in jail, which many times can be waived
  • At least 40 hours of community service
  • Substance abuse counseling
  • Attendance of the DUI Risk Reduction School (commonly referred to as DUI School)
  • Attendance of a Madd Mothers Victim Impact Panel
  • Drivers License Suspension, with a limited permit to drive

Georgia State law also requires clinical evaluation and the attendance of a DUI / Risk Reduction Program that’s certified/licensed by the Georgia Department of Driver’s Services before your driver’s license can be reinstated if you have been charged with any of the following:

  1. DUI
  2. Drug Possession
  3. Other drug offenses
  4. Under-age possession of drugs or alcohol

For more information about DUI School visit www.a1drivingschools.com or call (770) 962-9555!

2015 Deaths of GA Nursing Students Prompted Text-Free Driving Law

Photo: Google Images

A seven-car wreck took the lives of Emily Clark, Morgan Bass, Catherine Pittman, Abbie DeLoach, and Caitlyn Bagget six years ago.

The crash happened on their last day of clinical rotations in their first year of nursing school.

The accident and many others drove efforts toward Georgia’s Hands-Free driving law, which took effect in July 2018.

DeLoach’s family has kept her spirit alive through the creation of the Abbie DeLoach Foundation. It has distributed nearly $1 million in scholarships to Georgia nursing students, student-athletes, and outreach abroad in honor of her.

This year, the foundation is ramping up efforts to help reduce distracted driving by sharing #HandsFreeforAbbie images and messaging on social media and via companies to encourage drivers to make a commitment to drive phone-free by taking a pledge.

What Is Distracted Driving?

Distracted driving is any activity that diverts attention from driving, including talking or texting on your phone, eating and drinking, talking to people in your vehicle, fiddling with the stereo, entertainment, or navigation system—anything that takes your attention away from the task of safe driving.

Texting is the most alarming distraction. Sending or reading a text takes your eyes off the road for 5 seconds. At 55 mph, that’s like driving the length of an entire football field with your eyes closed.

You cannot drive safely unless the task of driving has your full attention. Any non-driving activity you engage in is a potential distraction and increases your risk of crashing.

Driving practices and rules that are taught in A-1’s Defensive Driving Class can be applied to be a safe driver.

For more information visit www.a1drivingschools.com or call (770) 962-9555!

Hit-and-Run Suspect Charged with DUI and Child Neglect

A woman wanted for a hit-and-run in Georgia was arrested in Northwest Florida after being pulled over for alleged drunken driving.

Photo: Google Images

The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office says a deputy pulled over 24-year-old Taylor Smith from Warner Robbins, Georgia, The sheriff’s office had received several calls describing Smith’s car as sideswiping another vehicle and continuing to drive on Highway 98.

Once pulled over, the deputy says Smith was visibly drunk and slurring her speech. A 3-year-old was found inside the damaged car during the traffic stop.

Breathalyzer test results from Smith came back as blood alcohol levels of .176 and .181. The legal percentage is .08.

Smith was charged and her child was turned over to the Florida Department of Children and Families. Florida Highway Patrol is investigating the hit-and-run on Highway 98

The next step for Smith is to complete a clinical evaluation and the attendance of a DUI / Risk Reduction Program that’s certified/licensed by the Georgia Department of Driver’s Services before his driver’s license can be reinstated since he has been charged with one of the following:

  1. DUI
  2. Drug Possession
  3. Other drug offenses
  4. Under-age possession of drugs or alcohol

For more information about DUI School visit www.a1drivingschools.com or call (770) 962-9555!

Insurance for High-Risk Drivers

In Georgia, motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of injury death and the second-leading cause of hospitalizations.

With such a significant number of injuries and fatalities attributed to car accidents, it comes as no surprise that Georgia insurance providers tend to take high-risk driving behaviors seriously.

Drivers are considered “high-risk” if they have been found at fault for an accident, have at least one speeding ticket, have a DUI conviction, or have had a lapse in insurance coverage. Following incidents such as these, it can be difficult for high-risk drivers to find affordable car insurance. By taking the necessary steps such as taking a driving course to correct their driving record and researching available providers in the region, high-risk drivers in Georgia can find the car insurance coverage solutions they need to stay safe and protected on the road.

Rates after a speeding ticket

Car insurance company Georgia average annual premium for full coverage before a speeding ticket Georgia average annual premium for full coverage after a speeding ticket % difference
Nationwide $1,202 $1,939 61%
Progressive $1,800 $1,946 8%
State Farm $1,375 $1,719 25%

Rates after an at-fault accident

Car insurance company Georgia average annual premium for full coverage before an accident Georgia average annual premium for full coverage after an accident % difference
Auto-Owners $1,494 $1,659 11%
Nationwide $1,202 $2,226 85%
State Farm $1,375 $1,834 33%

Rates after a DUI

Car insurance company Georgia average annual premium for full coverage before a DUI Georgia average annual premium for full coverage after a DUI % difference
Geico $1,711 $3,227 83%
Progressive $1,800 $2,067 15%
USAA $1,506 $2,126 41%

Who is a high-risk driver?

For the purposes of this article, Bankrate defines high-risk drivers as individuals who align with our base driving profile and have one or more of the following incidents on their record:

  • At-fault accident
  • Speeding ticket
  • DUI conviction
  • Lapse in coverage

The best step to take after falling into the high-risk driver category is generally to commit to safer driving habits. Once you’re able to maintain a clean driving record for at least five years, your insurance rates should go down significantly.

Information learned in class will apply whether you have been driving for years or you are a brand new driver.

For more information about class schedules or to see A-1’s 19 convenient locations call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!

Georgia Could Have a New Street Racing Law

Under recently passed legislation, higher penalties could soon be a result for people arrested on street racing-related charges.

State lawmakers passed the street racing bill at the end of this year’s legislative session, with bipartisan support in the House and Senate. It also has the endorsement of Gov. Brian Kemp, who publicly backed the bill during a February press conference, though he has not said when he might sign it into law.

Photo: Google Images

The new measure follows attempts by police departments and city governments in metro Atlanta to crack down “street racing” (dangerous driving in parking lots or on roads, or doing stunts in front of a cheering crowd).

Authorities said there was an uptick in 2020 as the pandemic emptied parking lots and streets, endangers drivers and pedestrians and the noise is a nuisance for nearby residents.

The measure, House Bill 534, allows authorities to suspend the licenses of some violators for up to a year and calls for penalties as high as $5,000. It creates the offense of “reckless stunt driving” and allows authorities to seize cars that are involved. Repeat offenders could be charged with a felony and face additional prison time.

Speeding is more than just breaking the law…

The consequences are far-ranging:
  • Greater potential for loss of vehicle control;
  • Reduced effectiveness of occupant protection equipment;
  • Increased stopping distance after the driver perceives a danger;
  • Increased degree of crash severity leading to more severe injuries;
  • Economic implications of a speed-related crash; and
  • Increased fuel consumption/cost.

Whether you are 15 and in need of taking the course or 45 and you just want to brush up on the rules and regulations of driving, A-1 Driving School is here to help!

We have 19 convenient locations around the metro Atlanta area offering different programs. For more information call (770)962-9555 or visit us at www.a1drivingschools.com!